Quick Info

  • London, England
  • Summer
  • : Panther Program
  • : Business, Business Information Systems, Finance, Global Management, Human Resources, Marketing, Supply Chain Management, Communication, English (including Literature, Writing, and Creative Writing), Film Studies, History, Political Science, Psychology, Sociology, Urban Studies
  • : July 4, 2018 - August 18, 2018
  • : $8,799 - In-State / $8,999 - Out-of-State
  • : January 28, 2018
  • : 2.75 GPA (2.5 for engineers), Pitt Students: Must have completed 24 credits on a Pitt campus, Clear Judicial Record

Academics

You should have no trouble finding Pitt in London courses that meet your requirements – just a take a look for yourself below.  Each course is worth three credits; you can take six credits during Summer Term 1 or Summer Term 2 or 12 credits if you participate in both.  Doing an internship?  Remember that counts as one class.  New courses may be added.  Coursework may count towards Global Studies Certificate. 

General Education Information

Need to fulfill a general education requirement?  We've got courses for that!  Take a look below:

Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences:
 
Historical Change:  HIST 1123, PS 1311
Literature:  ENGLIT 0580, ENGLIT 0625

This program satisfies the 3 foreign culture requirements.

Pitt Business:

Social Science: ECON 0500, HIST 1123, PS 1311, URBNST 1410
Literature: ENGLIT 0580
Markteting Electives: BUSMKT 1461
Business Core: BUSBIS 1060 - 1050

This program satisfies both foreign culture requirements.

British Faculty Courses

The Learning through Internships Program is an educational experience that gives students the opportunity to apply classroom learning to the workplace and social environment of the host culture, to expand professional skills and earn academic credit. The Focus Seminars and Regional Identities lectures and activities which make up an important part of the program are designed to provide theory and practice around societal themes which inform and enrich the internship experience. Students enrolling in GST 303 will earn 3 semester credits and intern 15-20 hours per week.

This course reflects the increasing amount of international marketing carried out by a wide and diverse range of organizations. Starting with why organizations may wish to expand their activities across national boundaries, students develop knowledge to identify which markets to enter, the methods of market entry available, and the management and control implications. The student will be encouraged to perceive the role of a global marketing manager, and to make decisions that could affect the outcome of a global marketing plan. This includes the international marketing environment and the international marketing mix, namely product, pricing, distribution and promotion, as well as emerging issues in international trade such as trading blocs, trade barriers, and the standardisation versus customisation dilemma.

The 1990s and 2000s saw the British film industry undergo a number of dramatic changes. From an all-time low at the end of 1980s, during the early 1990s British cinema entered a period of confidence and success that was mirrored by a major structural and financial reorganization. The course will chart the development of British film during the period 1994-2010 through the critical study of key films, and will examine the way that these films both emerge from and transform the earlier British cinema tradition. Readings will focus on the critical reception of the films and the manner in which they have been absorbed into the canon. There will also be particular focus on the political and social context of the films.

For a portrayal of the variety and depth of human emotions, Shakespeare has never been equaled. In this course, a selection of plays will be studied in depth, with equal focus on the genres of comedy, history and tragedy. Through visits to Shakespearean plays in performance, to the Globe theatre workshop, and through guest speakers, the plays will be examined not only textually but also as living plays that tell us as much about modern identity as the development of the early modern identity. Students will examine the notion of Shakespeare as 'timeless' to understand how vitally he moves from the concerns of his day to ours. This course requires an addition $70 fee to cover the cost of theatre tickets while in London.  You will pay this via credit card upon arrival..

This course will look at some key theories of popular culture, and include case studies of selected examples from the British Isles since 1945. Popular culture versus subcultures will be examined. The main aim will be to enable students to think independently about this topic. The course will include study visits to galleries, museums and other sites as an important learning experience. This course aims to draw in the students' previous educational and life experiences of culture and history, including oral cultures, popular and ethnic cultures and social and religious movements. It will compare British and American experiences of popular culture, the differences, similarities and cross-influences.

Where and what is Europe? Who are the Europeans? What is Europe's future? "Europe" has been a cultural idea that European elites have struggled to impose on the chaotic diversity of their continent. How has the concept "European" been defined historically, and in relation to whom? This interdisciplinary course addresses these fundamental questions of politics, geography and identity by tracing the history of "Europe" as a political concept and the cultural, political and economic factors that have shaped modern European countries. Such issues have been brought into close focus by the implications of European integration, destabilising assumptions about the territorial extent of Europe and the scales at which government, sovereignty and citizenship should operate. This course outlines the contemporary structures of the European Union and also investigates the various processes that have made Europe such a distinctive, dynamic and highly varied region. It also examines the historical roots of current tensions between - and within - the nation-states of Europe, such as ethnic nationalism, the legacy of imperialism and the politics of remembrance, and demonstrates how they continue to shape European politics today.

The course presents a socio-cultural approach to contemporary issues of children's development. The aim is to demonstrate the importance of understanding people in relation to their social world. Students will develop an understanding of life in the UK and explore how it shapes children's development. Issues such as children's early attachments, the development of the self, the emergence of consciousness, the role of play and the origins of disturbing behaviour will be examined.

Cities around the world are striving to be ‘global’. This course focuses on the development of one of the greatest of these global cities, London, from the nineteenth through to the twenty first century and investigates the nature and implications of its ‘globality’ for its built environment and social geography.  We will examine how the city has been transformed by the forces of industrialization, imperialism and globalization and consider the ways in which London and its inhabitants have been shaped by their relationships with the rest of the world.  Students will gain insight into London’s changing identity as a world city, with a particular emphasis on comparing the city’s imperial, post-imperial, and transatlantic connections and the ways in which past and present, local and global intertwine in the capital.  The course is organized chronologically: themes include the Victorian metropolis of the nineteenth century; London as an imperial space; multicultural London; London as a commercial centre of global capitalism; future scenarios of urban change. The course will mix classroom work with experiential learning, and will be centered on field trips to sites such as the 2012 Olympic sites, Soho, Whitehall, South Kensington, Spitalfields and Docklands in London’s East End to give students the opportunity to experience its varied urban geographies first hand and interact with these sites in an informed and analytical way.

Experiential Learning

More than 75 percent of Pitt-in-London students complete an internship, and with good reason.  Whether your post-graduation plans include entering the workforce, going to graduate school, or pursuing a different path, professional work experience always stands out on a resume.

Internships in London are 20 hours per week, excluding commuting time.  In addition to workplace experience, you will also meet with peers and faculty for internship seminars to help you get the most out of the experience.  Internships are always unpaid, always for three credits, and always pass/fail.

You can sign up for an internship regardless of your major as a part of the application process.  Keep in mind that you will not know what your internship placement is until 14 days before departure.  While this may seem like a long time to wait, keep in mind that our partners are searching for an internship just for you. Your past experiences, coursework, and desired placements areas are all taken into account.  This kind of personalized service takes time but is well worth the wait.

Please note that internships are availble for students in their second semester of sophomore year or higher.  

On-Site Faculty And Staff

 Pitt Faculty Member - Michael Meyer, the author of the acclaimed nonfiction books The Last Days of Old Beijing: Life in the Vanishing Backstreets of a City Transformed and In Manchuria: A Village Called Wasteland and the Transformation of Rural China. His writing has appeared in The New York Times, Time, The Financial Times, The Wall Street Journal, The Los Angeles Times, Smithsonian, Slate, Architectural Record, the Chicago Tribune, the Iowa Review, on This American Life, and in many other outlets. He is a former Peace Corps volunteer to China, and has represented the National Geographic Society’s Center for Sustainable Destinations there. He is the recipient of the Whiting Writers Award, a Guggenheim Fellowship, a National Endowment for the Humanities Public Scholar award, and residencies at the New York Public Library’s Cullman Center for Scholars and Writers and the Rockefeller Foundation’s Bellagio Center in Italy. He is a current fellow of the National Committee on United States-China Relations‘ Public Intellectuals Program and affiliated faculty with Pitt's Asian Studies Center.

CAPA, Pitt’s London partner, has a full-time support staff who are there to help you with whatever you might need during your stay.  Whether it’s housing, academics, or just recommendations on where to take your parents when they visit, the CAPA staff is there for you.

 

Housing

Part of the experience is to live like a Londoner.  The overwhelming majority of students choose to live in shared apartments – the English call them flats – spread across the city.  You will be one of as many as eight students living in a flat, which includes shared bedrooms and bathrooms, living space, and access to laundry facilities, all in a secure building.  The flats also come with an equipped kitchen; note meals are not included in the program fee.  Apartments are as varied as the city itself; no two flats are alike. 

Regardless of where you live, you can expect a 45- to 60-minute commute to both the CAPA Center and your internship (door-to-door).  We’ve got your commute covered with an unlimited pass for Zones 1 and 2 on the London Underground.

If apartment living does not appeal to you, homestays are also an option.  Email Brice for more information. 

Pricing And Dates


In-State Fee Out-of-State Fee
$8,799 $8,999
Arrive in London Depart London
July 4, 2018 August 18, 2018

Keep in mind that dates change.  You shouldn't book airfare until given confirmation from your program manager.

All students are required to attend the mandatory Pre-Departure Bash.  This afternoon long event will cover important topics relevant to study abroad like health, safety, security, and more.  Plus, it will give you the chance to meet other students studying abroad on your programs!  Alumni and staff will also be present to help you start thinking about your goals for the program.

The Pre-Departure Bash for this program will be on: February 10, 2018. Your program manager will follow up with more information once you begin your application!

Inclusions & Exclusions

As a part of your Pitt in London fee, the follow are included in the program:

  • Tuition for 6 credits
  • Housing
  • Orientation in London
  • Cultural Events and Activities
  • An Unlimited Tube Pass for Zones 1 and 2
  • Excursions to Stonehenge and Bath and Stratford-upon-Avon
  • Health Insurance
  • Membership to the University of London at Imperial College Student Union

While your program fee will cover most of your expenses, keep in mind that you are also responsible for the following:

  • Pitt Administrative Fee ($300)
  • Visa Fee (Interns only, $450)
  • Textbooks ($200)
  • Airfare ($1000-$1200)
  • Personal Expenses and Meals ($1500-$3000)
  • Airport Transfers ($40-$100)
  • Local Cell Phone ($100)

Remember that your lifestyle and spending choices can greatly affect the amount of money you'll need while abroad.  Visit our Budgeting page for more information.

Ready to get started on your application?  

Program Staff

Oksana Stalczynski

Walk-In Advising Hours: MWF 2-4 PM

Privet! I'm Oksana Stalczynski and I'm a Program Manager at the Study Abroad Office. I was born and raised in St. Petersburg, Russia, was an exchange student and Russian Language Scholar at Reed College in Portland, OR and did a summer language program in Dresden, Germany. A study abroad experience broadens your horizon, grows your circle of friends and improves your career opportunities. That’s why I think everyone should do one!

Feel free to contact me to find out more about study abroad programs at Pitt, and/or to learn/practice some Russian.  Get in touch with me at Oksana.stalczynski@pitt.edu or 412-383-3237!