Global Business Institute: London - Summer

Welcome to the Global Business Institute (GBI), your opportunity to study and practice business at one of five international campuses. GBI prepares you for the business world through coursework that advances your degree, offers out-of-the-classroom experiences that create cultural competence that provide you with transferable workplace skills.

A global center of finance, marketing, and economics, London offers an unparalleled setting for studying business. Along with Pitt faculty, your lecturers at the CAPA London Center will be faculty from world-renowned institutions throughout the city.

Learn the Underground as you commute from your flat in a London neighborhood.  From hands-on marketing experience to 

Want to learn more? Check out the Pitt Business To the World student blog and this video. 

Please note: due to COVID-19 visa restrictions, internships will not be available summer 2021.

 

What You'll Accomplish: 

As an engaged and active participant in this program, you will have the opportunity to:

  • fulfill major elective course(s) and general elective course requirements.
  • develop your global competency skills through coursework and cultural experiences.

If your first thoughts of London are the Royal Family and Downton Abbey, prepare to be blown away by what else London has to offer.  English history and culture are juxtaposed against streets filled with black cabs and lined with ethnic restaurants from Algerian to Indian to Vietnamese.  The birthplace of the English language is now home to speakers of more than 30 languages – and that doesn’t count the variety of English accents you will hear.  Skyscrapers tower over 17th-century buildings while Big Ben overlooks the River Thames. 
Study abroad at GBI: London and you find yourself constantly surprised by what you discover in one of the world’s most diverse global cities.

Where You'll Live: 

Part of the experience is to live like a Londoner. The overwhelming majority of students choose to live in shared apartments – the English call them flats – spread across the city. While apartments are as varied as the city itself and no two flats are alike, all of them are located in safe neighborhoods and secure buildings. Regardless of where you live, you can expect a 45- to 60-minute commute to the CAPA Center.  We’ve got your commute covered with an unlimited pass for Zones 1 and 2 on the London Underground.
You can expect the following:

  • Shared bedrooms (2 or 3 students/bedroom, single bed or bunk bed)
  • Bedding, but need to bring your own towels
  • Shared bathroom
  • Shared kitchen 
  • Internet access (for general browsing, but not meant for heavy downloading or streaming)
  • Coin operated laundry 
  • It is not typical for UK residences to have air conditioning or dryers

Please note that meals are not included in the program fee.
You will receive your address, roommate information, and neighborhood description about 2 weeks before your departure for London.
 
We do our best to provide the most accurate information about housing and amenities but due to the nature of the locations in which we offer programs and limited availability, these items are subject to change.  Contact your program manager with any questions.
 
If apartment living does not appeal to you, homestays are also an option.  Email your Pitt program manager for more information. 

What You'll Study: 

Most courses on GBI: London are 3 credits, and you can take 6 credits.
Information about how the courses on this program count towards general education requirements for different schools and campuses can be found below:
Summer

International Marketing (BUSMKT1461)

This International Marketing course will help you develop an understanding of the scope and challenges of marketing in the international context. The course examines how the global dimensions technology, research, capital investment and production impact marketing, distribution and communication networks. The breadth of this course will provide insights into the increasingly interdependent global economic and physical environment and its impact on international marketing. Globalisation has led to increasing interdependence. Connecting the dots has thus become essential to the survival and success of businesses, even those not operating in the international arena. By examining these linkages, the students will gain an understanding of how companies develop strategic plans that are competitive to survive and succeed in these global markets. The unique localised content provided by the CAPA centres will present further regional insights into the key issues surrounding marketing from an international perspective.

International Dimensions of Organizational Behavior (BUSORG1655)

This course fulfills a core requirement for the Certificate in International Business and the global management major. This course also fulfills the human resources major elective.
Provides an introduction to organizational behavior in a global context. Emphasis is on applying core organizational behavior concepts such as leadership, motivation, and group processes, as well as more contemporary topics such as cultural diversity and expatriation, to workers in Europe, Asia, and the Americas. Develops an understanding of culture and cross-cultural differences and an awareness of the key skills needed to interact effectively in cross-cultural settings.

The City Made Strange (ENGFLM1493)

This course fulfills the "Category II: Themes, Genres, and Theory" Film and Media Studies requirement and the "Specific Geographic Region" and "The Arts" General Education requirements for the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences.
 
London has existed for more than two thousand years, and the ghosts of the recent and ancient past remain abroad in its streets and its culture. This course aims to explore the deep funds of strangeness and otherness that permeate London’s places and spaces, through examining films and television series that show the city as a brimming reservoir of past and future shocks.
The course will examine science fiction, horror and noir/neo-gothic cinema and television from all eras, with a particular emphasis on works that take London itself as a major part of their story. These might be disaster or alien invasion films that see the city as a site of destruction or devastation, horror films which render a familiar city frightening and strange, or noir explorations of London’s underbelly that expose sides of the city that are normally hidden.
The course will both present an alternative history of London on film, and also provide students with rich possibilities for the analytic study of film and television. Horror and science fiction are notorious as vessels for the expression of both social and political anxieties, and the selection of films would encourage analyses of both psychological content and broader contexts (areas might include, for instance, Cold War-era fears, body horror, racial or class concerns).
Readings will be both critical and complementary, and hope to locate uncanny London on film in relation not only to American cinematic tropes in genres such as horror, but also to the large fictional and occult literature which features London as a place of archaic energies and occult forces.
All students develop their basic skills in analyzing film texts, and will also develop a good grasp of long-trends and recent themes in British horror and science fiction cinema. They will gain insight into the ways that film can reflect and respond to contemporary social and political conditions and events, and the way that film and television relate to literature. Students will gain an understanding of horror and science fiction as key genres in British film, and gain awareness of some key points at which these genres in British cinema and television differ from their counterparts in US film.
As a result, students on this course will:
- understand and engage with the international history of cinema (as well as that of other visual media forms) and be able to ­place media texts within their social, political, cultural and historical contexts.
-have hands-on experience in at least one area of film and media production (e.g. photography, film, video, video installation, or digital imaging).
-be able to write clearly, coherently and skillfully about the cinema (its history, theory, aesthetics, and/or social/cultural context).

Urban Scavenger (ENGFLM1497)

This course fulfills the "Category III: Film/Photo/Video Production" Film and Media Studies requirement and the "Creative Work" General Education requirement for the Dietrich School of Arts and Sciences.
 
The Urban Scavenger course takes the camera as a tool for the excavation of ordinary things scattered in the urban spaces of a modern metropolis. With a focus on the archaeology of banality and the relation between the public and the private we will explore the iconography of London through the lenses of surrealism, psychogeography and material culture studies. The course will look at a variety of moving image practices but with a special attention to the genres of the film essay, film diary and vlog, covered concurrently in the partner City Symphony course. By closely integrating practical elements with theoretical sessions, we hope to draw connections between the discourse on urban consumer society and the images surrounding it, between collecting objects and editing, between the order of things and creating a political narrative.     
Students will be asked to gather shots on a weekly basis responding to the discussions during the theoretical sessions. The shots will be uploaded to a dedicated video blog and commented on by the whole group throughout the term. Towards its end the footage collected by the students will be revised and they will be encouraged to use it when editing their own essay film.    
Methods of instruction will include screenings, in-class presentations and analyses, filming sessions, field trips to unusual London locations, crits or review sessions and editing supervision.

Introduction to Shakespeare (ENGLIT0580)

For a portrayal of the variety and depth of human emotions, Shakespeare has never been equaled. In this course, a selection of plays will be studied in depth, with equal focus on the genres of comedy, history and tragedy. Through visits to Shakespearean plays in performance, to the Globe theatre workshop, and through guest speakers, the plays will be examined not only textually but also as living plays that tell us as much about modern identity as the development of the early modern identity. Students will examine the notion of Shakespeare as 'timeless' to understand how vitally he moves from the concerns of his day to ours. This course requires an addition $70 fee to cover the cost of theatre tickets while in London.  You will pay this via credit card upon arrival.

Post-war Pop Culture in Britain (ENGLIT1760)

This course will look at some key theories of popular culture, and include case studies of selected examples from the British Isles since 1945. Popular culture versus subcultures will be examined. The main aim will be to enable students to think independently about this topic. The course will include study visits to galleries, museums and other sites as an important learning experience. This course aims to draw in the students' previous educational and life experiences of culture and history, including oral cultures, popular and ethnic cultures and social and religious movements. It will compare British and American experiences of popular culture, the differences, similarities and cross-influences.

Writing the City - London (ENGWRT1200)

This course will introduce creative writing in relation to the city and the particular challenges of writing about place. Students will examine how various subjects such as the river, urban spaces, solitude, ethnicity, particular boroughs, and characters (both fictional and real) function in London narratives; develop an understanding of the role of memory and experience in literary psycho-geographical accounts of the metropolis; utilize their observations of London to practice creative writing; and investigate the potential of place within the narrative of various genres.

West European Government and Politics (PS1311)

Where and what is Europe? Who are the Europeans? What is Europe's future? "Europe" has been a cultural idea that European elites have struggled to impose on the chaotic diversity of their continent. How has the concept "European" been defined historically, and in relation to whom? This interdisciplinary course addresses these fundamental questions of politics, geography and identity by tracing the history of "Europe" as a political concept and the cultural, political and economic factors that have shaped modern European countries. Such issues have been brought into close focus by the implications of European integration, destabilising assumptions about the territorial extent of Europe and the scales at which government, sovereignty and citizenship should operate. This course outlines the contemporary structures of the European Union and also investigates the various processes that have made Europe such a distinctive, dynamic and highly varied region. It also examines the historical roots of current tensions between - and within - the nation-states of Europe, such as ethnic nationalism, the legacy of imperialism and the politics of remembrance, and demonstrates how they continue to shape European politics today.

Child Development in a British Context (PSY1050)

This course investigates the aims and principles of developmental psychology as a scientific discipline, and describes the methods used to obtain knowledge about children and their development. Issues such as children's early attachments, the development of the self, the emergence of consciousness, and the role of play are examined, with an emphasis on the role of education and child care practices and policies in the UK in shaping children's development.

Analyzing and Exploring the Global City -London (URBNST1410)

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the modern development of one of the world's most significant global cities in comparative context. It examines London's changing identity as a world city, with a particular emphasis on comparing the city's imperial, postcolonial, and transatlantic connections and the ways in which past and present, local and global intertwine in the capital.

Pitt runs this program in partnership with CAPA: The Global Education Network. For more than 45 years CAPA: The Global Education Network has worked with institutions of higher education to build programs that meet students goals for learning abroad. 
The CAPA London Center is housed in 2 connected Victorian townhouses in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea, and their staff will be there to assist with any questions or challenges through out the program. 

Your Pitt Study Abroad Contacts: 

Arielle Schweber

Bonjour! I’m the International Programs Manager for Pitt Business. I’m originally from New York but have spent some time in France, as I have dual nationality. I’m new to the city and university, but I can’t wait explore my inner yinzer! Since high school, I have participated in short and long term study abroad programs.  My first stop was in Spain, then a semester in France and finally two short term programs in Cuba and India. Outside of the office you can find me exploring new restaurants, biking, skiing, watching HGTV or planning my next adventure! My hope is for every Pitt student to study abroad. You can get in touch with me at aschweber@business.pitt.edu or 412-383-7489.

 

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Items Billed by Pitt

  In-State Out-of-State
Tuition $4,656 $4,856
Program Fee $3,940 $3,940
Study Abroad Fee $300 $300
Total Billed by Pitt $8,896 $9,096

Estimated Additional Out-of-Pocket Costs

Airfare $1,000 - $1,200
Personal Expenses and Meals $1500 - $3,000
Local Cell Phone $100
   
   
   

Total Estimated Program Cost

  In-State Out-of-State

Total Estimated Cost of Program
(Includes items billed by Pitt and additional expenses)

$11,496 - $13,196 $11,696 - $13,396

 

What's Included: 

As a part of your GBI: London fee, the following are included in the program:

  • Tuition for 6 credits
  • Housing
  • Orientation in London
  • Cultural Events and Activities
  • An Unlimited Tube Pass for Zones 1 and 2
  • Excursions to Stonehenge and Bath and Stratford-upon-Avon
  • Health Insurance
  • Membership to the University of London at Imperial College Student Union
When You'll Go: 

The program start date is Thursday, June 3 and end date is Saturday, July 17, 2021.

What Else You Need to Know: 

All students are required to attend the mandatory Agreement Meeting.  This afternoon long event will cover important topics relevant to study abroad like health, safety, security, and more.  Plus, it will give you the chance to meet other students studying abroad on your programs!  Alumni and staff will also be present to help you start thinking about your goals for the program. Your program manager will follow up with more information once you begin your application! 

Scholarship Information
For scholarship opportunities, be sure to check out the Pitt Study Abroad page.  

Pitt Business students may also apply for additional scholarships through the Pitt Business International Scholarships here, as well as crowdfund using the Pitt Business Fund My Travel page. Please note that the application deadline for the Pitt Business International Scholarship is the same as the program application deadline.