Your Health

Pitt Study Abroad prioritizes your health in all phases of a global experience - before, during, and after your travels. While a global experience can be an exciting adventure, it also brings about new and different challenges. We want you to have the tools and information to take care of yourself and seek the help you may need or want. Whether you enter a program with an existing health concern or whether one pops up while on-location, you can prioritize your own health by being informed of the resources available and taking the time to prepare and plan.
 
We encourage you to thoroughly review the subsequent pages of information and also refer to the Safety & Security,  Diversity & Identity and Wellness sections of our site.

Your Health - Before you Go

Maintaining health and wellness starts before your travel. It is important to research the country and city in which you will be studying to be aware of any health concerns that may be present and actions you can take to mitigate the risk. Likewise, you should be aware of your health to take proper care of yourself and to stay well and healthy abroad.

Here are a few important tasks to do before travel:

The University has contracted with International SOS (ISOS) to provide comprehensive health and security coverage to Pitt student, faculty, and staff traveling for University-related studies or business. ISOS is the world’s leading medical and travel security risk services company.

ISOS coverage provides medical and medical assistance coverage for the dates of your program. It covers:

  • Doctor and hospital visits (for physical and/or mental health needs)
  • Prescribed medication
  • Medically required transportation while abroad
  • Medically required evacuation and repatriation

ISOS also provides:

  • Travel Safety and Security Advice – The University of Pittsburgh ISOS program includes assistance in safety and security preparation before travel abroad and during travel.
  • Health & Safety Line Response – ISOS provides first-line response on the Study Abroad Health and Safety Line and will only pass a call to Study Abroad Office staff in certain situations.

ISOS does NOT cover:

  • Follow up care when you return to the US
  • Routine care – for example: physical exams or routine maternity expenses, non-emergency mental health and substance abuse expenses, surgical second opinions, or home health care
  • Injuries due to certain activities – for example: injuries related to accidents caused by using motorized vehicles and/or engaging in adventure sport activities
  • Personal travel before or after the program dates

We recommend purchasing additional insurance if you are traveling before or after your program.

Before You Travel 

  • If you are taking any medication, ISOS can provide pre-departure guidance on the legality of medications and supplements and the process necessary to carry them with you overseas.
  • If you have a pre-existing condition(s), ISOS can open a case for you before your departure for the program. Your study abroad program manager will work with you on that process after you submit your medical report.
  • We strongly recommend you download the ISOS Assistance App. This convenient app features: ​
    • One-click dialing to the ISOS Assistance Center closest to your location, for immediate help or advice 24/7/365​
    • The latest medical and travel security alerts for your location, with notifications being sent before and during trips​
    • NOTE: You must have a functioning data plan for your country of travel and location services must be turned on for this app to work. When you first start the App, you will be asked to enter your Membership Number, please input the following: 11BMAS563390.

After you commit to the program and before departure for your program you are required to submit your medical report. The medical report is a form located within your online program application which asks you some basic questions regarding your past and present health conditions. Information you provide in the medical report does not prohibit your participation in the program to which you are accepted, but rather it will help us to navigate how to best help you to prepare you for your global experience. 

Mild health conditions may become more serious under the stresses of life while away. It is important to disclose any pre-existing conditions, past or current treatment, and medications in your medical report. The ability of the Study Abroad staff and the University of Pittsburgh to assist you in case of an emergency may be compromised if you do not report a medical or mental health condition during the planning process.

Whether or not you have a condition that affects your mental, emotional, or physical health, you should meet with your healthcare professionals to make sure that you are ready to travel. Examples of things to discuss with your healthcare professional(s):
  • Current/previous health issues (anxiety, asthma, depression, diabetes, etc.)
  • Current medications
  • Allergies
  • Disabilities
  • Dietary restrictions

If you have a current or ongoing condition, travel can exacerbate symptoms, but an honest discussion with your healthcare professional(s) will provide you with strategies to mitigate any complications, where possible. Likewise, travel can resurface previous conditions. For example, even if you haven't needed migraine medicine in over a year, you may want to consider still discussing this with your healthcare professional.  

Create a treatment plan with your healthcare professionals before you go, and share it with the Study Abroad Office via the medical report document. 

  • For example: for mental and emotional wellness support while traveling, International SOS also offers zoom or skype sessions with therapists through WPO.  The administration or prescription of medication is not managed through WPO services; but International SOS can assist with referrals to local psychiatrists as needed. These sessions can be pre-arranged before you go.   

Don’t forget a dental check-up and an eye exam (especially if you anticipate your prescription may need to be updated).

Be sure to check out the following resources related to your health while traveling:
You are required to receive vaccinations and acquire prophylaxis medication/equipment in accordance with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and local provider recommendations for the host country prior to travel and will need to carry documentation of this.
 
Allegheny County Health Department also provides information about recommended and required immunizations and administers them. 

Advanced planning for medication

Some prescription medication, over-the-counter medications, herbal supplements, and other forms of medicine that are legal in the US may be illegal in your host country or while traveling. If you are taking any medication, International SOS (ISOS), the University’s international health insurance provider, can provide pre-departure guidance on the legality of medications and supplements and the process necessary to carry them with you overseas. 

For each medicine you will carry, perform these steps:

  • Gather an ample supply to last your entire trip. Medications cannot be sent in the mail.
  • Keep all drugs in their original packaging. 
  • Make a copy of the prescription if it is a prescription drug.
  • Have your healthcare provider write a note describing the medicine and why you need it. It is best to get this on letterhead.
Sexual Health Considerations
 
For students studying abroad, consider that other cultures may view sexual health differently. Additionally, laws may differ in other locations pertaining to sexual activity and sexual health. As in the U.S., students traveling abroad should take appropriate precautions to avoid exposure to sexually transmitted diseases (STD). Some places in the world have a higher rate of sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV and hepatitis, than the U.S. Take all necessary precautions to keep yourself safe and healthy. You should be aware of condom quality, HIV antibody testing, clean blood supplies, sterile needles, and medical facilities in your host country. Additionally, products, resources, and access to safer sex products can vary and potentially be more difficult to acquire.
 
Condoms and Emergency Contraception Caution
 
Condoms can be difficult to acquire in some parts of the world. In addition, the ones you do find may be of lesser quality than the ones to which you are accustomed. Remember that STIs can be transmitted through various sexual acts, including sexual activity involving condoms and other preventative measures. You may, however, want to bring condoms with you, even if you are not planning on being sexually active while abroad. In some locations, emergency contraception is often not readily available or may be illegal to dispense.
 
HIV Antibody Testing Requirements
 
Some countries screen incoming travelers (especially those on extended visits and students) and prohibit entry of those with AIDS and those who have tested positive with HIV. Any country may reserve the right to require HIV testing from any visitor. Make sure you are aware of the screening and testing policies of any country you might visit. This information is available from the consular officers of individual countries or by calling 202-647-1488, which is the U.S. State Dept. Office of Public Affairs.
 
The U. S. State Department’s website for travelers, www.travel.state.gov, has more information on HIV/AIDS screening for each country.
 
If You Think You May Have Been Infected with HIV
 
Knowing your status will help you in planning your trip. While pre- and post -counseling are required for persons being tested in the US, this is not true of many countries. Therefore, you may consider being tested before leaving the country. Special medical facilities may be needed and this is information you should seek out before you begin the program. Your program director can help you locate the medical facilities you may need. Free, confidential testing is available at the Allegheny County Health Center on Forbes Avenue. The Student Health Center here at Pitt also performs HIV/AIDS testing and counseling as part of your Student Health Fee.
 
Additional Information
 
In addition to those already mentioned, the following hotline is a valuable source of more detailed information: Center for Disease Control National AIDS Information -- 800-342-AIDS

If you are managing a chronic condition, we request that you disclose this on your Medical Report or directly to your program manager or Pitt-recognized provider soon after being accepted to your program. By disclosing, you are providing us (or your Pitt-recognized provider) the time to make preparations to help you in the best way possible (i.e. placing a refrigerator in your room for vials of insulin, ensuring you have information for local AA meetings, etc.). Please note: disclosing a medical condition will not cause you to be removed from your program after being accepted.

  • If your condition is followed/managed by a medical specialist, it is a good idea to meet with him/her before you leave to discuss a treatment plan should you experience complications abroad. Make a copy of this and carry it with you at all times—it can speak for you if you cannot speak for yourself.
  • It is advised that you take your own syringes if you require regular injections.
  • If you have a special medical condition, it is a good idea to buy a bilingual medical alert bracelet.
  • If you use any kind of specific, over-the-counter medications, ointments, acne cures, etc. (that you cannot live without), take enough to last your entire trip.
 
You can also find listings of travel medicine clinics and providers at the following websites:
 

 

International Society of Travel Medicine

Travel Health Online

Allegheny County Health Department

 
As you participate and prepare for your global experience you will be transitioning from your culture to a host culture.Culture is a set of shared attitudes, values, goals, and practice that characterize a racial, religious, or social group. Culture can be divided into two parts surface culture and deep culture. Surface culture are things we can observe within a culture. Deep culture is something we cannot tangibly observe in a culture. Below are examples of both types of culture: 
 
 Surface Culture  
  • Local cuisine  
  • Popular items to wear/ not to wear  
  • Musical selection  
  • Difference in your native language(s) vs. the host language(s)    

Deep Culture  

  • Knowing when it is or if it is appropriate to question a professor in a classroom setting.  
  • Customs relating to age, class, family, etc.  
Terms related to cultural transitions 
 
  • Cultural Surprise – positive phase to a new culture where new surface level culture is exciting.  
  • Cultural Exploration - seeking understanding of new cultural context on both surface and deep cultural level.   
  • Cultural Adjustment - trial and error while making conscious and unconscious decisions reflecting ability to navigate daily life in host culture.  
  • Cultural Conflict – response to surface level behaviors that may be of annoyance or irritation in challenging values of behaviors or encountering a difficult situation exacerbated by an unfamiliar cultural context.  
  • Cultural Fatigue - typically occurs in response to high levels of stimuli for an ongoing period and processing new cultural information and behaviors. Can be accompanied by "language fatigue" for individuals learning a second language.  
  • Cultural Stress  – common response to being highly stimulated for an extended period. Can lead to withdrawal or stress response behaviors such as excessive sleeping or higher than usual emotional responses.  

It can be exciting and challenging when you are confronted with cultural norms that are very different from what you know. Prepare yourself by learning all you can about your host culture. As a guest in a new cultural setting, listen, observe, absorb what is happening around you, and your own reactions to the differences. You can’t change your host culture, but you can consider changing your reaction to it.  

The most important thing to keep in mind is that no one person has the same exact reaction or experience in how they process cultural transitions. Going through this type of life transition is not a linear experience but rather a spectrum of different emotions that can change and occur at any time during your global experience. Developing a positive coping skill such as a sport, meditation, or speaking to those in your program can help as you are transitioning from one culture to another. Remember, cultural transitions can affect different parts of your wellness. For more information on dimensions of wellness abroad please visit our Wellness Pages
 
Questions to Consider:
  • Have you researched the location which you will be participating in a global experience? 
  • Do you currently have a positive coping skill to alleviate stressful situations? 
  • Do you have a plan regarding how you can reach out to others if you are feeling overwhelmed by your cultural transition? 
  • Have you read all the resources available on the abroad website to help through this time? 
  • Do I have a preconception of my host location? 
  • What are some preconceptions my host location may have of an American student? 
  • Have you become familiar with cultural transition definitions on the website?
 
Students on special diets should be aware that their dietary needs might not be easily met in some countries. Discuss your needs in advance with your healthcare provider and your study abroad program manager or program provider as necessary. You should list any special dietary needs in your Medical Report, in the Diet and Medical Abroad questionnaire, as well as in any housing or other program-specific forms. 
The Center for Disease Control – Provides country-specific information about required or recommended immunization and medications, and travel preparation tips.
World Health Organization - Specialized agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health and provides a comprehensive health profile for each country.
Your Health Abroad - State Department – Provides country-specific health, safety, and security information.
 
Here are the CDC recommendations for packing a travel health kit.
There are many different tips and suggestions for staying healthy while you are away as well as how you can prepare for staying healthy on your global experience before you go in the Wellness Pages, Diversity & Identity page, and the Safety& Security pages.  Check them out!
  • University Student Health Service* ​- Provides high quality primary health care, prevention, health education, and pharmacy services to enhance student living and learning. 
  • University Counselling Center* - Students can engage in private or group counseling sessions, wellness workshops, have access to trauma and self-care resources, diversity resources, resources for allies and much more.  
  • International SOS - Provides health and security coverage to Pitt student, faculty, and staff traveling for University-related studies or business. 
  • Allegheny County Health Department – Provides vaccines including travel immunizations. 
  • The Center for Disease Control – Provides country-specific information about required or recommended immunization and medications, and travel preparation tips. 
  • World Health Organization - Is a specialized agency of the United Nations responsible for international public health. 
  • Your Health Abroad - State Department – Provides country-specific health, safety, and security information. 
  • TAO* - (Therapy Assistance Online) - Private online library of engaging, interactive programs to learn life skills and to help you bounce back from disappointments or stumbling blocks in life. You can complete TAO videos or interactive modules at your own pace.  Free service provided to Pitt students; login with your PittID.
  • Good Therapy - provides a list of therapists and counsellors in many destinations; also lists if the healthcare provider speaks English. 
Apps 
  • ISOS Assistance - One-click dialing to the closest ISOS Assistance Center and medical and security travel advice before and during trips. Available for Android and iOS. 
  • CDC’s TravWell - Provides destination-specific vaccine recommendations, a checklist of what you need to do to prepare for travel, and a customizable healthy travel packing list. Available for Android and iOS. 
  • My Travel Health - Is based on technologies licensed from the Mayo Clinic and designed to help travelers safeguard their health before, during and after travel. Available for Android and iOS. 
  • TAO* - (Therapy Assistance Online) - Self-guided and interactive tool. Private online library of engaging, interactive programs to learn life skills and to help you bounce back from disappointments or stumbling blocks in life. You can complete TAO videos or interactive modules at your own pace.  Free service provided to Pitt students; login with your PittID. Available for Android and iOS.
The University of Pittburgh's Office of Public Safety and Emergency Management will continue to provide updates that apply to the broader campus community at https://www.emergency.pitt.edu/coronavirus
 

 

Your Health - While Away

Your health and wellness during your program have a direct impact on your academic success and cultural adaptation. If you are struggling with health issues, you may miss classes, be less involved in the local communities, and may not have an optimal overall experience. Prepare for a safe and healthy global experience by following recommendations from the Pitt Study Abroad Office, your program provider, and/or host institutions, and from the CDC and other reliable sources.  

  • In emergency situations, contact the in-country equivalent of 911.  Here’s a handy reference list of  emergency contact numbers in  foreign countries.
  • In non-emergency health and safety situations, contact International SOS, the University Health Insurance provider:  +1-215-942-8478​ 
  • In either situation, keep your faculty leader, program manager, and on-site staff informed. 

For mental and emotional wellness support, International SOS also offers zoom or skype sessions with therapists through WPO.  The administration or prescription of medication is not managed through WPO services; but International SOS can assist with referrals to local psychiatrists, as needed.  In either situation, contact International SOS, 24/7, so that the appropriate assistance can be provided.

  • ISOS will help locate a qualified healthcare provider, receive a prescription, or simply answer any  general medical or security concern you may have so you get quality medical care and advice. 
  • In an emergency, ISOS can ensure that you get immediate care whether it requires evacuating you to a center of medical excellence or closely monitoring your condition with local  doctors. 
  • The ISOS program provides medical, security and logistical expertise to help safeguard Pitt’s international travelers. If you lose your medication in Prague, need to see a doctor in  New  Delhi, get pick-pocketed in Rio or, are in an  accident, you should immediately contact ISOS. 
  • To use this insurance most effectively, you should contact ISOS directly to coordinate care BEFORE going  to a medical facility if possible or practicable. Failure to do so greatly increases the chance that you will be required to pay the  costs up-front, in  which case, you will need to save your receipts and contact ISOS after treatment for reimbursement  instructions. 
  • This insurance does not cover injuries related to accidents caused by using motorized vehicles and/or engaging in adventure sport  activities. 
  • This insurance coverage is only in effect during your actual program dates and thus it does not cover any independent travel before or after your  program.  

 

Jet lag can be a problem for travelers who are crossing several time zones.  Although it is not a serious condition, jet lag can make it hard for you to enjoy your first few days on-location. Here are a few tips you can take to minimize the effects of jet lag: 

  • Drink plenty of water before, during, and after your flight. The air on planes is extremely dry and it is easy to become dehydrated when not drinking enough fluids.
  • Avoid large meals, alcohol, and caffeine during your travel.
  • On long flights, get up and walk around periodically to stretch your muscles.
  • Sleep on the plane if you can.
  • After arrival, stay awake until the local bedtime. If you are sleepy during the day, take short naps (20–30 minutes) so you can still sleep at night. Eat meals at local meal times.

Please review these additional recommendations from the CDC on how to minimize the effects of jet lag. 

Sexual Health While Abroad
 
The “rules” of dating vary from culture to culture. Regardless of any dating or romance “rules,” though, you can be clear about your own boundaries. It is important that you inform yourself as best as possible about how dating and relationships generally function in the host culture. Researching cultural norms may help you in identifying an interaction that seems wrong or dangerous. Overall, you are encouraged to be cautious about sexual activity while abroad.
 
Condoms and Emergency Contraception Caution
 
Condoms can be difficult to acquire in some parts of the world. In addition, the ones you do find may be of lesser quality than the ones to which you are accustomed. Remember that STIs can be transmitted through various sexual acts, including sexual activity involving condoms and other preventative measures. In some locations, emergency contraception is often not readily available or may be illegal to dispense.  
 
HIV Antibody Testing Requirements
 
Some countries screen incoming travelers (especially those on extended visits and students) and prohibit entry of those with AIDS and those who have tested positive with HIV. Any country may reserve the right to require HIV testing from any visitor. Make sure you are aware of each country's policy to which you will be traveling. This information is available from the consular officers of individual countries or by calling 202-647-1488, which is the U.S. State Dept. Office of Public Affairs.
 
The U. S. State Department’s website for travelers, www.travel.state.gov, has more information on HIV/AIDS screening for each country.
 
Sexual Harassment, Violence, or Assault
 
If you would like to report an incident of sexual violence while on your program, or are in need of supportive services, you can connect with Pitt’s Office of Sexual Harassment and Assault Response and Education (SHARE). In addition, if you so choose, you can also reach out to your program manager, program provider, on-location contacts, ISOS, or local emergency services for help or to be directed to more resources.

Unclean food and water can cause traveler’s diarrhea and other diseases.  Some locations have a higher risk for these conditions than others. Reduce your risk by sticking to safe eating and drinking habits.  Here are a few tips:

  • Avoid uncooked food from street vendors.
  • Avoid dairy products that are not refrigerated or pasteurized.
  • Eat fruits and vegetables you have washed in clean water or peeled yourself.
  • Do not drink water unless you know that it is safe for drinking; bottled water is recommended. Make sure the factory seal is intact.
  • Avoid ice cubes in drinks unless you know that the ice was made from water safe for drinking.
  • Do not leave drinks unattended or drink anything opened out of your sight.
  • Wash your hands with soap and clean water or use an alcohol-based sanitizer before eating.

Please visit the CDC’s food and water safety page for more information. 

 A large number of incidents while students are participating in global experiences involve alcohol or drugs. Being impaired in a foreign environment increases your risk for an incident as you are more likely to make decisions that put yourself or others in danger.   For more information on this topic, please refer to the Safety & Security pages. 

It is important to prepare yourself for a potentially different physical environment. Environmental risk factors can contribute to disease and injury. Locations around the world have unique environmental risk factors that you may not be used to mitigating at home. It’s important to prepare for the environment in which you are going. 

Air Pollution
Many countries around the world do not have regulations on air pollution. It is important to learn about the air quality of your program’s location and how take measures to protect yourself.

Resources to help you protect yourself from air pollution during your program: 

High Altitude
The higher you go, the “thinner” the air becomes and if you go too fast, the body cannot properly get the oxygen it needs. Anyone that travels to above 6,500 feet can experience problems such as altitude sickness. Here are a few tips for acclimating to higher altitudes:

  1. Learn about your destination. An easy way to check the elevation is through websites like Velo Routes.
  2. Visit your doctor to learn more about their recommendations, prevention tips and remedies for altitude illness. It is especially important for individuals with pre-existing medical conditions to talk with their doctor about higher altitude before travel.
  3. Acclimate slowly - move slowly and take rests when you need. 
  4. Review the resources below and learn the danger signs of altitude illness.  

Resources to help you prepare for high altitudes during your program: 

Bug Bites
Bugs, including mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, and some flies, can spread diseases such as malaria, yellow fever, Zika, dengue, chikungunya, and Lyme, all of which have risk of severe and lasting consequences. It is important to check your destination (CDC) for recommended shots, medicines and advice to help you prevent bug bites. 

 Resources to help you prepare for and prevent bug bites during your program: 

Additional Environmental Health Concerns Resources

Making the decision to engage in a global experience  wil l take you away from the familiar. This can be exciting and challenging when you are confronted with cultural norms that are different from  your own. Your  global  experience  will not be a linear graph but rather a spectrum of different emotions you can experience at different times depending on a variety of factors such as academics, health,  etc.  They can be similar or different from those of your classmates as we are all affected by events and life changes differently.  Some transitions that you may experience are  excitement, exploration, adjustment, conflict, fatigue and/or stress. Everyone  experiences life  shifts  differently and may experience all or limited transitions as listed previously.  Here are some tips for cultural transitions: 

  • Be aware that you  may be seeing your host culture through your own cultural glasses which is influenced by your own  societal surface and deep culture.  
  • As a guest in a new cultural setting, listen, observe, absorb what is happening around you, and  reflect on your own reactions to the differences.   
  • Do not  be afraid to ask question and speak with locals.  
  • You  cannot  change your host culture, but you  can consider changing your reaction to it.  
  • Practice any positive coping mechanism  that work best for you.  
  • Avoid social media and  following  events back home. 
There are many different tips and suggestions for staying healthy while you are participating on your global experience in the Wellness pagesDiversity & Identity page, and the Safety & Security pages.  Check them out!
Resources
  • University  Counselling Center*- Students can engage in private or group counseling sessions, wellness workshops, have access to trauma and self-care resources, diversity resources, resources for allies and much more.  
  • International SOS - Provides health and security coverage to Pitt student, faculty, and staff traveling for University-related studies or business. 
  • The Center for Disease Control – Provides country-specific information about required or recommended immunization and medications, and travel preparation tips. 
  • Your Health Abroad - State Department – Provides country-specific health, safety, and security information. 
  • TAO* (Therapy Assistance Online) - Private online library of engaging, interactive programs to learn life skills and to help you bounce back from disappointments or stumbling blocks in life. You can complete TAO videos or interactive modules at your own pace.  Free service provided to Pitt students; login with your PittID.
Apps 
  • ISOS Assistance - One-click dialing to the closest ISOS Assistance Center and medical and security travel advice before and during trips. Available for Android and iOS. 
  • CDC’s TravWell - Provides destination-specific vaccine recommendations, a checklist of what you need to do to prepare for travel, and a customizable healthy travel packing list. Available for Android and iOS. 
  • CDC’s Can I Eat This? - Helps you prevent traveler’s diarrhea and other illnesses you might get from contaminated food and water. Available for Android and iOS. 
  • TAO* - (Therapy Assistance Online) - Self-guided and interactive tool. Private online library of engaging, interactive programs to learn life skills and to help you bounce back from disappointments or stumbling blocks in life. You can complete TAO videos or interactive modules at your own pace.  Free service provided to Pitt students; login with your PittID. Available for Android and iOS.

 

Your Health - When you return

After travel, you might return home with health concerns. Fortunately, many after-travel illnesses are mild, such as a head cold or an upset stomach. However, other travel-related conditions or post-program transitions may be more serious, and symptoms may not show up until long after you get home.

The CDC recommends that you seek medical attention if you are not feeling well after travel, whether you have diarrhea, anxiety, skin problems, depression, trouble breathing, or other issues. Be sure to tell your healthcare provider about your travel, including where you went and what you did. This information will help your healthcare provider consider infections that are rare or not found in the United States. Some details to include: 

  • Your vaccination history 
  • What you did as you traveled (activities, excursions, etc.) 
  • How long you were gone 
  • Where you stayed (hotel, dorm, homestay) 
  • What you ate and drank 
  • Whether you were bitten by bugs or bitten, scratched, or licked by animals 
  • Whether you swam in fresh water 
  • Whether you received health care abroad 
  • Any other possible exposures to infections like sexual encounters, tattoos 

Experiencing stress, low moods, anxiety etc. is common as students transition to new environments.  This can occur when you return after a global experience as well.   Some students may feel that the adjustment upon returning home is more challenging than the adjustment to the new setting. These adjustments can also exacerbate an already existing condition or cause a pervious condition to resurface. There are many support options available to you for your mental and emotional wellness, some of which are referenced here.  The University Counselling Center has many different services available both in person and virtually.  Other resources are listed below in the Resources tab and in the Cultural Transitions tab as well as in the Emotional Wellness pages.  Students may also want to connect with others who have gone through similar transitions after a global experience; the Alumni page has suggestions for how to reach out and be involved with others who can offer empathy and support.

Here are some After Travel Tips  from the CDC. 
 
For additional information regarding Physical Wellness,  Emotional Wellness,  Spiritual Wellness  or other Dimensions of Wellness upon your return please visit our Pitt Study Abroad Wellness pages. 
The cultural transition experience does not end once you return from your host location. Just as you may have to adjust to a new dorm or room in a familiar setting you will experience a new transition upon your arrival. Due to your new experiences you may have adapted some cultural norms along the way or question norms you may have in your home culture. Just as your experience abroad can range from an array of emotions the same can happen with your re-entry back home. Below are some resources to help with re-entry challenges some students may experience upon their return. Please note the resources below are not from the University of Pittsburgh but rather third-party organizations. 
 
Resources 
Coming Home from Abroad - Article from Transitions Abroad regarding how student relationships, foundations, and reception can change during various aspects of their global experience. 
Tips for Dealing with Reverse Culture Shock When You Return Home - Diversity Abroad article with various article highlighting some of the difficulties students may face upon arrival from their host location.   
Top Ten Immediate Reentry Challenges - Meredith University provided list of compiled stories from students coming back from their experience abroad have found difficult upon their re-entry. 
 
There are many different tips and suggestions for staying healthy after you return from your global experience in the Wellness pagesDiversity & Identity page, and the Safety& Security pages.  Check them out!
  • University Student Health Service* ​- Provides high quality primary health care, prevention, health education, and pharmacy services to enhance student living and learning. 
  • University Counselling Center* - Students can engage in private or group counseling sessions, wellness workshops, have access to trauma and self-care resources, diversity resources, resources for allies and much more.  
  • TAO* - (Therapy Assistance Online) - Private online library of engaging, interactive programs to learn life skills and to help you bounce back from disappointments or stumbling blocks in life. You can complete TAO videos or interactive modules at your own pace.  Free service provided to Pitt students; login with your PittID.
Apps 

 

  • My Travel Health - Is based on technologies licensed from the Mayo Clinic and designed to help travelers safeguard their health before, during and after travel. Available for Android and iOS. 
  • TAO* - (Therapy Assistance Online) - Self-guided and interactive tool. Private online library of engaging, interactive programs to learn life skills and to help you bounce back from disappointments or stumbling blocks in life. You can complete TAO videos or interactive modules at your own pace.  Free service provided to Pitt students; login with your PittID. Available for Android and iOS.